New Student Orientation

Welcome to Lindsay Middle School!

This guide provides information about Hampton City Schools’ academic programs and educational services designed for the middle school level. Information provided will help students and parents understand the educational requirements and elective opportunities available.

The middle school program for students in grades six, seven, and eight provides a gradual transition from the individual elementary classroom structure to the independent course, departmentalized structure of the secondary level. All students take English/Language Arts, math, social studies, science, health and physical education, and electives.

The curriculum features academic programs for students of all levels of ability. Interdisciplinary approaches, team teaching, flexible time blocking, and special programs are unique features in the middle school design. Exploratory elective courses are offered at all grade levels. Each school designs its programs based on its curriculum offerings. Some electives are offered for a semester, or on a rotating basis and others may be offered as yearlong courses.

There are also opportunities to take courses for high school credit. In accordance with the Standards of Accreditation, parents of middle school students taking high school courses may request that grades be expunged from their child’s academic history. The student will not earn high school credit for the course and this course will not count towards the student’s grade point average (GPA). The decision to count a student’s grade for high school courses taken in middle school must be finalized at the end of each school year. Once a student leaves middle school all changes are final. To be consistent with high school procedures, grades will be reported by semester and both semester grades will count towards the student’s GPA. Individual semester grades cannot be expunged. Teachers of high school credit courses will provide consent forms at the end of each school year. Parents wishing to discuss which option is best for their student should contact the school counselor.

Each student is assigned a school counselor who works with students, teachers, and parents during the middle school years to provide personal, social, academic and career planning programs and services to ensure maximum success for each student.

The school counselor, parent and student will develop an Academic and Career Plan that will address the interests and aptitudes of the student. This plan will serve as a guide for yearly conferences and decisions to be made throughout middle and high school.

Parent conferences are welcomed and encouraged throughout the school year. To make an appointment for a conference with the team, individual teacher or counselor, please contact the School Counseling Department secretary in each school.

New Student Orientation Flipgrid

Language Arts

ENGLISH 6 The core curriculum at grade six is a study of literature and application of reading strategies. Students learn about the literary elements of the short story, the novel, and poetry. Nonfiction informational texts and media are also included and students will analyze information and topics across genres. There are four strands of instruction: Communication and Multimodal Literacies, Media Literacy; Reading; Writing; and Research. In each strand, students read, write, think critically, and respond both orally and in writing. Writing at this level focuses on the process of writing a well-developed, multi-paragraph essay. Students write narration, description, exposition, persuasion and reflection. The students will also apply the research concepts of collecting and evaluating information to incorporate into a piece of writing. The curriculum has been aligned with the Virginia Standards of Learning. Students will take the Grade 6 Reading SOL test.

ENGLISH 7 The core curriculum at grade seven is a study of literature that includes short stories, poems, novels, nonfiction, informational, and media texts. Students will apply reading strategies and analyze information and topics across genres. There are four strands of instruction: Communication and Multimodal Literacies, Media Literacy; Reading; Writing; and Research. Students will read, write, and think critically. Writing at this level includes expository, narrative, persuasive and reflective. The students will also apply the research concepts of collecting and evaluating information to incorporate into a piece of writing. The curriculum has been aligned with the Virginia Standards of Learning. Students will take the Grade 7 Reading SOL test.

ENGLISH 8 The core curriculum at grade eight is a study of literature that includes fictional texts, narrative nonfiction, poetry, nonfiction, and media. Students will apply reading strategies, analyze information and topics across genres, and continue to strengthen their skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. There are four strands of instruction: Communication and Multimodal Literacies, Media Literacy; Reading; Writing; and Research. Writing at this level will challenge students to produce narrative, expository, reflective writings, and a research product. The curriculum has been aligned with the Virginia Standards of Learning. Students will take the Grade 8 Reading and Writing SOL tests.

*All middle and high school students in Hampton are required to complete summer reading prior to the start of school in September. Various assignments will begin in all classrooms when school opens in September.

Summer reading titles and requirements will be made available spring each year.

READING AND WRITING EXPLORATION Reading and Writing Exploration is a Tier 2 intervention for middle schools designed to provide explicit and targeted instruction for developing readers and writers. Students will develop conventions of print and non-print text, appropriate word recognition and vocabulary skills, strategies to increase reading comprehension, responding to text through writing and discussion, and foundational and advanced strategies to improve writing outcomes. The intervention course also includes whole group instruction, small group instruction, independent reading, and computer-based vocabulary practice. The intervention can benefit students in many ways. Students who meet the criteria receive additional explicit and systematic instruction every other day for 90 minutes. In addition, students will have access to 4 5 reduced class sizes, engaging multi-genre materials, and immediate feedback and support to guide students to mastery. The goal of the intervention is to aid students in meeting grade-level expectations in the Tier 1 English Language Arts course.

Science

The science curriculum of the Hampton School system places heavy emphasis on providing laboratory experiences for all students. Opportunities are provided for students to investigate their environments through a balanced program of life science, physical science, and earth-space science.

GRADE 6 - SCIENCE The sixth-grade standards continue to emphasize data analysis and experimentation. Methods are studied for testing the validity of predictions and conclusions. Scientific methodology, focusing on precision in stating hypotheses and defining dependent and independent variables, is strongly reinforced. The Earth’s environment is explored through the role of water, the sun’s energy, the atmosphere, and the impact of man. A more detailed understanding of the solar system becomes a focus of instruction. Natural resource management and its relation to public policy and cost/benefit tradeoffs are introduced.

GRADE 7 - LIFE SCIENCE Life science deals with the diversity of living things. This science encompasses all aspects of living things from the study of cells to the complex interrelationships of all living organisms and their interaction within their environment. Laboratory investigations and activities are the primary means for developing problem-solving and for understanding scientific concepts and principles. Whenever possible, these investigations and activities will relate to the students’ own life experiences.

GRADE 8 - PHYSICAL SCIENCE Physical science contains certain general topics common to physics and chemistry. Some of the common topics covered include work, power, energy, physical and chemical properties of matter, and electricity. Many experiments completed by the teacher and the student will enable the students to gain a greater depth of understanding of their environment. Students enrolled in this course will take the grade 8 Science Standards of Learning test. This test covers grade 6 and 7 (Life Science) standards as well.

Social Studies

GRADE 6 - UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1865 This is the first portion of a two-year study of United States history in middle school. Beginning with an in-depth study of the physical setting of the United States, the course proceeds into the analysis of how humans have interacted with the unique geographic setting throughout American history. The major historical periods for this course are life before the seventeenth century, early exploration, colonial life, challenges faced by the new government, and key events and effects of the Civil War. Instruction is also devoted to reviewing and strengthening map and globe skills, analyzing and interpreting documents such as the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and developing historical thinking skills with an emphasis on sequencing and cause and effect.

GRADE 7 - UNITED STATES HISTORY FROM 1865 TO PRESENT This is the second portion of a two-year study of United States history in middle school. Beginning with a review of the physical setting of the United States, the course proceeds into the analysis of how humans have interacted with the unique geographic setting throughout American history. The major historical periods of this course are Reconstruction; effects of immigration and industrialization; involvement in World War I; ideas and events of the 1920s and 1930s; the events and effects of the Great Depression, the major causes, events, personalities of World War II; and economic, social, and political transformations since World War II. Instruction is also devoted to reviewing and strengthening map and globe skills, analyzing and interpreting documents, slogans, and patriotic speeches, and developing historical thinking skills with an emphasis on sequencing and cause and effect.

GRADE 8 - CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Topics for eighth grade students cover the role of the citizen in the American political and economics systems. The focus is on gaining essential knowledge of the U.S. and Virginia Constitutions and the structure and functions of government institutions at the national, state, and local levels. Students also learn the basic principles, structure and operation for the American economy. These topics are intended to foster patriotism, respect for the law, a sense of civic duty and informed economic decision-making. Social science skill development extends into data organization and interpretation. Students will take the Civics and Economics SOL test.

Mathematics

The secondary mathematics program provides a sequence of courses designed to meet the individual ability, interest and needs of each student. Basic concepts and processes are introduced and then reencountered as other ideas logically follow. Flexibility is provided in that different levels of a subject are offered. A student may move from one level to another as his achievement dictates. Traditional four-year college preparatory mathematics courses are available for the students who require an educational program designed for careers in science, engineering, and mathematics. Each student enrolled in Algebra I, II, or Geometry is encouraged to have a TI-84 Plus graphing calculator.

GRADE 6 (COURSE I) This course offers a myriad of opportunities for students to become active participants in learning mathematics. Technology is integrated through practice exercises and laboratory experiences. Through problem solving, students explore numerous thinking strategies and interdisciplinary connections from historical, social, scientific, mathematical and literary perspectives. Learning activities are organized to provide for different learning styles, interests, and abilities. The major content of this course includes tools for problem solving, graphs and statistics, operations with whole numbers, decimals and fractions, probability, patterns and number sense, investigations in geometry, ratio, proportion, percents, area, volume, investigations with integers, and an introduction to algebra. Students in this course will take Grade 6 Math Standards of Learning (SOL) test.

GRADE 6 (COURSE I HONORS) This course includes all of the concepts in Course I, as well as, several components of Course II. Emphasis is on patterns, functions, and algebra, investigations in geometry, and probability and statistics. Students in this course will take Grade 6 Standards of Learning (SOL) test. Students who are successful in Course I Honors will take Course II Honors the following year. PRE-ALGEBRA – GRADE 6 This course focuses on the 8th grade SOLs and includes topics and concepts, which will prepare students for Algebra I. SOLs for grades 6 and 7 are appropriately covered in the corresponding grade level. Simple open sentences using whole numbers, rational numbers, and integers are solved. This course reviews proportions, percent applications, and geometry. Probability, statistics, graphs and the coordinate plane are also included. Students will take the Grade 8 SOL Math test.

GRADE 7 (COURSE II) Math 7 is the second course in the three-year sequence of an in-depth preparation for algebra. The content of this course builds on Math 6 and continues to emphasize the basic fundamentals of mathematics while expanding concepts of pre-algebra. The course offers myriad opportunities for students to become active participants in learning mathematics. Hands-on experiential, as well as technology, are integral components of this program. Math 7 provides abundant opportunities for students to develop and integrate their communication skills through modeling with manipulatives, speaking, writing, and demonstrating what they have learned. The major content of this course includes tools for problem solving, applications with whole numbers, decimals, fractions and percents, statistics and data analysis, patterns and number sense, an introduction to algebra, integers, investigations in geometry, area, volume, ratio, proportion and percent, discrete mathematics and probability, and functions and graphs. Students will take the Grade 7 Math SOL test.

GRADE 7 HONORS (Course II Honors) This course includes all of the concepts in Course III, as well as, the concepts in Course II that were not taught in Course I Honors. Emphasis is on patterns, functions, and algebra; investigations in geometry; and probability and statistics. Students who are successful in Course II Honors will take Algebra I the following year. Students in this course will take Grade 8 Math Standards of Learning (SOL) test.

GRADE 8 (COURSE III) In this course, concepts of the real number system are extended. The emphasis is on the solution of simple open sentences with integers and rational numbers and the application of mathematics, especially decimals and percents in every day situations. Geometry, statistics, probability, and problem solving are also included. Additionally, students who successfully complete the sequence of Course I, II, and III are prepared for Algebra I in the 9th grade. Students in this course will take Grade 8 Math Standards of Learning (SOL) test.

ALGEBRA I - GRADES 7-8 Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra or Course II Honors This course includes the development of the Real Number System, graphs, linear equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations, polynomials, functions, rational and irrational expressions, and roots of numbers and statistics are explored and developed. Students will receive one high school credit for the course and must take and pass the Algebra I End of Course SOL test for a verified credit.

GEOMETRY - GRADE 8 Prerequisite: Algebra I In this course students develop an understanding of the meaning and nature of Geometry. They obtain information about geometric relationships in order to use this information in future courses in mathematics, science and related fields. Plane geometry, solid geometry and coordinate geometry are integrated within this course. It is an accelerated course on the seventh and eighth grade levels. Students will take the Geometry End of Course SOL test. Students will receive one high school credit for the course and must take and pass the Geometry End of Course Standard of Learning (SOL) test for a verified credit.

Fine Arts - Art Courses

The art curriculum is designed to develop skills in using a variety of art media as a creative means of personal expression and communication. Students will enhance communication skills through critiquing and analyzing artworks. Students will learn important 21st century skills such as problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity through the art-making process.

GRADE 6 This course is designed to introduce students to the various media used in the visual arts. Students will draw, paint, create using three-dimensional media, and explore craft traditions. Emphasis is on skill building and learning to critique and analyze works of art using the elements and principles of design, as well as develop an appreciation for art as it relates to their lives.

GRADE 7 This course is designed to build on the skills previously learned in elementary or Grade 6 art. The focus is on exploring a variety of media as a means of self-expression. Drawing, painting, crafts, and three-dimensional projects enhance the skills while teaching the students an appreciation for art history and culture. 13 Students will develop their art vocabulary through critiques and analyzing works of art using the elements and principles of design. Student will develop an appreciation for art and how it impacts their community and society through visual messages.

GRADE 8 This course is designed to build on the design elements through the manipulation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional media. Students will create using a variety of media such as drawing, painting, clay, paper-mache, jewelry making, printmaking, lettering, graphics, etc. Students will develop their art vocabulary through critiques and analyzing works of art. Students will explore art as a means of self-expression. Students will develop an appreciation for art history, cultural artifacts, and the global impact art has on our lives.

Business and Information Technology

KEYBOARDING –GRADE 6 This course is designed for middle school students to develop touch skills for entering alphabetic, numeric, and symbol information on a keyboard. Students learn to produce simple technical and non-technical documents.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (18 WEEKS) – GRADE 7 Prerequisite: Keyboarding recommended Students gain a basic knowledge of word processing, spreadsheet, database, and graphics applications. Students demonstrate an understanding of computer concepts through application of knowledge. Students learn to use a variety of software applications. State technology Standards of Learning are addressed.

MAKE IT YOUR BUSINESS - (18 WEEKS) – GRADE 7 This introduction course in business is based on the application of business terminology, basic entrepreneurship concepts, and fundamental business principles. Learn to design, establish, and operate a small group or class business, Producing a service or product that meets an identified school or community need. Basic academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) are integrated into this course.

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS AND MARKETING (YEAR LONG - HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT COURSE) – GRADE 8 • Explore the roles of business and marketing in the free enterprise system and the global economy • Gain knowledge and appreciation of the American business system • Make decisions as consumers, wage earners, and citizens • Plan for further study in business and marketing careers • Research and projects are computer based

Fine Arts - Music Courses

The music curriculum is designed to develop performance skills in singing or the various instruments of band. Students develop the skills to proceed to high school music courses.

GRADE 6 EXPLORATORY MUSIC This is a nine-week course designed to introduce students to the beginning knowledge and skills in chorus and band. Students will explore both vocal and instrumental music.

BEGINNING CHORUS This is a yearlong course for students who have no chorus experience or only an elementary chorus experience. The emphasis is on tone, beginning music reading, practice skills, and performing. School performances may be required.

BEGINNING BAND This is a yearlong course for students who have no band experience using brass, woodwind, or percussion instruments. The emphasis is on tone, beginning music reading, practice skills, and performing. School performances may be required.

GRADE 7 BEGINNING INTERMEDIATE CHORUS Prerequisite: Beginning Chorus or Chorus Director approval This is a yearlong course for students who have taken beginning chorus. The emphasis is on tone, intermediate music reading, rehearsal skills, and performance. Students perform in a full chorus ensemble. After-school rehearsals and performances are required.

BEGINNING INTERMEDIATE BAND Prerequisite: Beginning Band or Band Director approval The band director may divide this class into brass, woodwind, and/or percussion. This is a yearlong course for students who have taken beginning band. The emphasis is on tone, intermediate music reading, practice skills, rehearsal skills, and performance. For percussion students the emphasis is on intermediate music reading, practice skills, rehearsal skills, and performance skills using: snare drum, mallet keyboards, timpani, auxiliary percussion, and drum set. Students perform in a full band ensemble. After-school rehearsals and performances are required.

GRADE 8 INTERMEDIATE - ADVANCED CHORUS Prerequisite: Beginning Chorus or Chorus Director approval This is a yearlong course for students who have taken beginning chorus and have experience in a full chorus ensemble. The emphasis is on tone, intermediate-advanced music reading, practice skills, rehearsal skills, and performance. After-school rehearsals and performances are required.

INTERMEDIATE - ADVANCED BAND Prerequisite: Beginning Band or Band Director approval The band director may divide this class into brass, woodwind, and/or percussion. This is a yearlong course for students who have taken beginning band and have experience in a full band ensemble. The emphasis is on tone, intermediate-advanced music reading, practice skills, rehearsal skills, and performance. For percussion students the emphasis is on intermediate-advanced music reading, practice skills, rehearsal skills, and performance skills using: snare drum, mallet keyboards, timpani, auxiliary percussion, and drum set. After-school rehearsals and performances are required.

Health and Physical Education

The middle school health and physical education program in Hampton offers varied opportunities and learning experiences designed for the development of physically, emotionally and socially competent citizens. Each course offers information and activities, which will help students develop the skills necessary for developing an understanding of the importance of lifelong wellness habits.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (GRADES 6 - 8) Students in middle school physical education will experience a varied program of developmentally appropriate skills, activities and fitness education. Emphasis of the program is the acquisition and development of basic skills and the confidence necessary to participate in and enjoy physical activity. A major focus of the program is to provide enjoyable experiences to foster a positive feeling for physical activity, leading to a physically active lifestyle.

HEALTH (6 - 8) Health Education at the middle school level is designed to help students acquire an understanding of age appropriate health concepts and skills necessary for them to make healthy decisions in order to improve and promote personal, family and community health. Students will receive 13 weeks of health education interspersed throughout the year. Topics of study include:

  • Physical Health 6: Urinary System / Body Systems & Impact of Disease on the Body
  • Physical Health 7: Benefits of Physical Activity / Active Transportation / Circulatory System / Sleep
  • Physical Health 8: Assessing Health Habits & Risks / Disease Prevention / Fitness Plan
  • Social Health 6: Bullying / Gangs / Violence Prevention / Conflict Resolution Skills
  • Social health 7: Interpersonal Relationships Violence Prevention / Bullying / Gangs
  • Social Health 8: Violence Prevention / Bullying / Gangs / Social Networking Safety
  • Physical Health 6: Substance Abuse Prevention / Personal Safety / First Aid
  • Physical Health 7: Risk Behaviors / Substance Abuse Prevention / Advertising Techniques
  • Physical Health 8: Substance Abuse Prevention / Resistance Skills
  • Nutrition: Nutrition and Energy Balance 6: Macro-nutrients/ Analyze diet/ Create Food Plan/ Influences media impact
  • Nutrition: Nutrition and It’s Effect on the Body 7: Analyzing nutritional values/ Intake and Requirements/ Healthy Breakfast/Consumer Choices
  • Nutrition: Eating Disorders / Nervous System 8: Healthy Eating Plan/ Managing Weight/ Body Image/ Eating Disorders/ Nervous System
  • Emotional and Environmental Health 6: Understanding Emotions/ Stress Management/ Pollution/ Protect the Environment
  • Emotional and Environmental Health 7: Stress Management/ Disappointment/ Pollution/ Healthy Environment
  • Emotional and Environmental Health 8: Mental and Emotional Health/ Stress/ Depression/ Suicide/ Environmental Health
  • 6-8 Family Life Education

World Language

GRADE 6 COURSE This is an introductory course to languages. The students will learn about language families. The students will be introduced to French, German, Latin, and Spanish. The course also incorporates the study skills that will facilitate student success in the study of world language.

MODERN WORLD LANGUAGE Modern World Language includes French I-IV/V, German I-IV and Spanish I-IV/V. Students who are considering applying for the International Baccalaureate (IB) program should check with their school counselor for world language requirements.

MODERN WORLD LANGUAGE I • Exchange simple spoken and written information in the world language • Sustain brief oral and written exchanges in the world language • Understand simple spoken and written language based on familiar topics that are presented through a variety of media. • Use verbal and non-verbal cues to understand simple spoken and written messages in the world language • Present orally and in writing information in the world language using a variety of familiar vocabulary, phrases and structural patterns • Present rehearsed material in the world language, including dialogues, poetry and/or songs • Develop an awareness of perspectives, practices and products of cultures where the world language is spoken • Recognize that the perspectives, practices and products of the cultures studied are interrelated • Recognize how information acquired in the study of world language and information acquired in other subjects reinforce one another • Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of culture through comparisons between the cultures studied and the cultures of the United States • Compare basic elements of the world language to the English language • Identify situations in which world language skills and cultural knowledge may be used beyond the classroom setting for recreational, educational and occupational purposes • Students will receive 1 high school credit for completing a Modern world Language I course 8

MODERN WORLD LANGUAGE II Prerequisite: successful completion of Modern World Language I • Exchange spoken and written information and ideas in the world language • Demonstrate skills necessary to initiate, sustain and close brief oral and written exchanges in the world language using familiar and recombined phrases and sentences • Understand basic spoken and written language based on new topics in familiar contexts that are presented in a variety of media • Use verbal and non-verbal cues to interpret spoken and written texts in the world language • Present orally and in writing information in the world language that combines learned as well as original language in simple sentences and paragraphs • Present rehearsed and unrehearsed material in the world language including skits, poems, play and/ or songs • Demonstrate an understanding of perspectives, practices and products of the cultures and how they are interrelated • Use information acquired in the study of the language and information acquired in other subject areas to reinforce one another • Demonstrate an understanding of cultural similarities and differences between the cultures studied and the United States • Develop a better understanding of the English language through the study of the world language • Develop and apply world language skills and cultural knowledge in opportunities beyond the classroom setting for recreational, educational and occupational purposes • Students will receive 1 high school credit for completing a Modern World Language II course

Technology and Engineering Education

INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY – GRADE 6 (9 WEEKS) • Experience technology including the basic elements of all technology, including processes, energy, information, and people. • Learn basic materials and apply simple machines to real problems. • Explore up to six systems of technology, including biotechnology, energy, construction, transportation, communication, and production/manufacturing. • Relate the impact of technology on society, environment, and culture to future decisions. • Discover and explore personal interests, aptitudes and abilities.

INVENTIONS AND INNOVATIONS – GRADE 7 (18 WEEKS) • Learn modern materials and design processes. • Design and build a project. • Explore technological problems facing your community and the modern world • Learn to invent new products or innovations.

TECHNOLOGICAL SYSTEMS - GRADE 8 (36 WEEKS) • Students combine resources and techniques into systems, realizing technology as a system. • By simulating systems, assessing their impacts, and relating this experience to the two previous levels, students gain an insight into how to approach the problems and opportunities of a technological world in a broad sense. • They also explore occupational areas and educational programs for technology-oriented careers

Practical Tips for Middle School Success

for Parents of Middle School Students

The middle school years are a notoriously tumultuous time for parents and kids alike. Below are some tips for parents to help their child avoid the common pitfalls of middle school.

ORGANIZATION

To help kids take on the added responsibilities of the middle school years, encourage them to:

  • Use a student agenda notebook. Encourage them to review their assignments before leaving school to make sure they bring home the appropriate books and material.
  • Use color-coded folders or binders to keep track of the supplies and paperwork for each subject.
  • Maintain school supplies at home.
  • Consider a weekly family planning meeting.

STUDY SKILLS

To do well, students should:

  • Spread project and test preparation over several days instead of the night before a due date.
  • Establish a regular time and place to do daily homework.
  • When in doubt, ask their teachers to explain assignments.

FINDING THE BALANCE BETWEEN FUN AND WORK

Choosing to make schoolwork a priority over socializing with friends is one of the biggest challenges facing middle schoolers. To help kids put schoolwork first:

  • Institute a work first/play later policy.
  • Encourage friendships with kids who take school seriously.

AVOID THE “WHY WORK HARD?” TRAP

During the middle years, many kids try to take the easy way out - they would rather take a lesser grade than put in the extra time and energy needed to do really well. To avoid this trap:

  • Show them the connection between their interests and what they are learning now.
  • Offer praise for a job well done.
  • Celebrate their success.
  • Challenge them to take on the more difficult course work.

Attendance

Make-up work policies are at the discretion of individual teachers, but will be communicated via their course syllabus.

Vacations must be approved by the Principal in advance in order to be documented as an excused absence.

Homework

  • Each content area has a different homework policy.
  • 20 minutes each night for each course.
  • Math is usually more flexible because of double block schedules.

Discipline and Cell Phone Policy

Discipline is handled according to the HCS Rights & Responsibilities Handbook, and students receive an assembly regarding this information twice during the year.

Cell phones are NOT allowed in class. If a student brings their cell phone to school, it has to be off and in their locker. If it is seen or heard, it will be taken to the office. Parents will be required to pick it up in person.

HCS Middle School Promotion and Retention Policy

Students in grades six through eight who demonstrate satisfactory classroom performance in the four core content areas of English, mathematics, history/social science, and science, plus a minimum of one elective course and achieve at the proficient level on the English and mathematics Standards of Learning (SOL) assessments will be promoted.

Students who demonstrate satisfactory classroom performance and fail to achieve at the proficient level on the English and mathematics SOL assessments will be promoted and required to attend and demonstrate satisfactory performance in summer school or another intervention program as approved by the building administrator/designee.

Students who do not demonstrate satisfactory performance in one of the four core content areas plus one elective course may be awarded a provisional promotion. The building administrator/designee will consider student performance on Standards of Learning assessments in making the decision to award a provisional promotion. The student will be required to attend and demonstrate satisfactory performance in summer school or another intervention program as approved by the building administrator/designee. The school’s Student Intervention Team (SIT) must review the student’s classroom performance within the first month of the new school year to develop a retention intervention plan. Students must attend interventions as outlined by the SIT Team.

Students who do not demonstrate satisfactory classroom performance and fail to achieve at the proficient level on the SOL assessments in the core content areas of English, mathematics, history/social science, and science will be retained. A SIT meeting must be held within the first month of the new school year.

Students who do not pass any of the SOL assessments in grades six through eight must attend summer school or participate in an intervention program as required. Middle school students will be eligible for one provisional promotion. The building administrator/designee may grant an additional provisional promotion when there are extenuating circumstances.

Students with disabilities attain promotion in accordance with the goals, accommodations, and impact of the disability defined in the student’s individualized education program (IEP) when not on an SOL curriculum.

Students with accommodations through 504 plans are provided access to the general curriculum and therefore are required to meet promotion criteria for their respective grade levels.

HCS Parent Notification Policy

Parents will be informed of their child’s academic progress through a variety of avenues including, but not limited to, quarterly progress reports and report cards, parent/teacher conferences, graded assignments sent for review on a regular cycle, electronic communication as appropriate, notes and telephone calls. Additionally, parents of students not meeting grade level expectations will be notified at a parent/teacher conference as well as in writing. Such notification will be made at the following intervals:

  1. End of the first grading period
  2. End of the first semester
  3. By March 1st possible retention will be documented; and
  4. Final retention notification will be made within three (3) working day of receipt of the SOL Assessment results.

HCS Right to Appeal Policy

  1. To the building administrator/designee – Parents may appeal the decision to retain their child in the current grade placement. The request for the appeal must be made in writing to the building administrator/designee. This request should be made within five (5) working days of receipt of notification of retention. The building administrator/designee will respond to the parent within five (5) working days of receipt of appeal.
  2. To the Executive Director of School Leadership – Parents may appeal the decision of the building administrator/designee. The appeal must be made in writing to the appropriate Executive Director of School Leadership within five (5) working days of receipt of the building administrator/designee’s decision.

How to open your school-issued lock

You can practice so that you will be ready when you receive your lock.